April 25 - June 8

Subscriptions on sale in May. Single tickets on sale August 1.

 

Dance Series 2

World Premiere, by Amy Seiwert

Wild Sweet Love, by Trey McIntyre

The Eternal Idol, by Michael Smuin

Sinfonietta, by Rex Wheeler

 

New premieres and old favorites define Dance Series 2. Artistic Director Amy Seiwert creates a World Premiere, her 13th ballet for the Company. Trey McIntyre returns to Smuin with the Bay Area premiere of his Wild Sweet Love, an ode to the ups and downs of love set to a range of music from Mendelsohn to Queen. McIntyre’s “fertility of invention and modernity of spirit” (The New York Times) is no stranger to Smuin, and we’re delighted to add another of his ballets to our repertory. Completing the program is a pair of favorites: Michael Smuin’s Rodin-inspired The Eternal Idol, originally choreographed for American Ballet Theatre superstars Cynthia Gregory and Ivan Nagy and Smuin Alum Rex Wheeler’s spritely, springy Sinfonietta.

 

April 25 – May 4, San Francisco

May 23 – 24, Walnut Creek

May 29 – June 1, Mountain View

June 7 – 8, Carmel

Calendar for Dance Series 2

  • 7:30pm

    Blue Shield of California Theater - Yerba Buena Center for the Arts

    700 Howard St. San Francisco, CA

  • 2:00pm

    Blue Shield of California Theater - Yerba Buena Center for the Arts

    700 Howard St. San Francisco, CA

  • 7:30pm

    Blue Shield of California Theater - Yerba Buena Center for the Arts

    700 Howard St. San Francisco, CA

  • 2:00pm

    Blue Shield of California Theater - Yerba Buena Center for the Arts

    700 Howard St. San Francisco, CA

  • 7:30pm

    Blue Shield of California Theater - Yerba Buena Center for the Arts

    700 Howard St. San Francisco, CA

  • 7:30pm

    Blue Shield of California Theater - Yerba Buena Center for the Arts

    700 Howard St. San Francisco, CA

  • 2:00pm

    Blue Shield of California Theater - Yerba Buena Center for the Arts

    700 Howard St. San Francisco, CA

  • 7:30pm

    Blue Shield of California Theater - Yerba Buena Center for the Arts

    700 Howard St. San Francisco, CA

  • 2:00pm

    Blue Shield of California Theater - Yerba Buena Center for the Arts

    700 Howard St. San Francisco, CA

  • 7:30pm

    Walnut Creek's Lesher Center

    1601 Civic Dr. Walnut Creek, CA

  • 2:00pm

    Walnut Creek's Lesher Center

    1601 Civic Dr. Walnut Creek, CA

  • 7:30pm

    Mountain View Center for the Performing Arts

    500 Castro St. Mountain View, CA

  • 7:30pm

    Mountain View Center for the Performing Arts

    500 Castro St. Mountain View, CA

  • 2:00pm

    Mountain View Center for the Performing Arts

    500 Castro St. Mountain View, CA

  • 7:30pm

    Mountain View Center for the Performing Arts

    500 Castro St. Mountain View, CA

  • 2:00pm

    Mountain View Center for the Performing Arts

    500 Castro St. Mountain View, CA

  • 7:30pm

    Carmel's Sunset Center

    San Carlos St at 9th Ave Carmel, CA

  • 2:00pm

    Carmel's Sunset Center

    San Carlos St at 9th Ave Carmel, CA

Trey McIntyre

Trey McIntyre

Choreographer, Wild Sweet Love

Trey McIntyre was created in 1969 as a collaboration between his mother and father. His interest both in art and getting the hell away from Kansas led him to train at North Carolina School of the Arts and the Houston Ballet Academy. In 1989, he was appointed Choreographic Apprentice to Houston Ballet, a position created especially for him, and in 1995 he became the company’s Choreographic Associate. He has worked for more than 30 years as a freelance choreographer, producing more than 100 pieces during the span of his career so far. He also did a bunch of other cool things, including working with a lot of amazing companies such as The Stuttgart Ballet, American Ballet Theatre, Queensland Ballet, Hubbard Street Dance Chicago, New York City Ballet, Oregon Ballet Theatre, BalletX, The Washington Ballet, Ballet Memphis, and San Francisco Ballet.

He has won numerous awards and honors such as the Choo San Goh Award for Choreography, a Lifetime Achievement Award from The National Society of Arts and Letters, two personal grants for choreography from The National Endowment for the Arts, and is a United States Artists Fellow. In 2019, he won the Isadora Duncan Award for Outstanding Achievement in Choreography for his work Your Flesh Shall be a Great Poem, which he created for San Francisco Ballet for their Unbound Festival. He was named one of Dance Magazine’s “25 to Watch” in 2001, one of People Magazine’s “25 Hottest Bachelors” in 2003, and one of Out Magazine’s 2008 “Tastemakers.” The New York Times critic Alastair Macaulay said of Mclntyre, “…There’s a fertility of invention and a modernity of spirit here that are all Mr. Mclntyre’s own.” The Los Angeles Times wrote, “…There is indeed such a thing as genuine 21st century ballet, and it belongs more to this guy from Wichita than any of the over-hyped pretenders from England, France or Russia.”

In 2005, he founded his dance company, Trey McIntyre Project, achieving great audience and critical success. McIntyre created over 23 original works for the company as well as numerous film projects, interactive site specific works, and photography collections.

A confessed polymath, McIntyre has developed a cult following for his photography of the human body (see more at Patreon), written several published essays, and completed the feature-length documentary Gravity Hero, which premiered at the Dance on Camera Film Festival at Lincoln Center.

His main focus recently has been adding more love into the world. He loves you and doesn’t even know you.

Amy Seiwert

Amy Seiwert

Choreographer, World Premiere

Amy Seiwert enjoyed a nineteen-year performing career dancing with Smuin, Los Angeles Chamber, and Sacramento Ballets. As a dancer with Smuin, she became involved with the “Protégé Program,” where Michael Smuin was her mentor. She retired as a dancer from Smuin in 2008. That same year, Celia Fushille named her Choreographer in Residence, a position she held for a decade. She is the recipient of numerous choreographic awards, including a “Goldie” award from the San Francisco Bay Guardian in 2010, which described Seiwert as the Bay Area’s most original dance thinker, “taking what some consider a dead language and using it with a 21st-century lingo to tell us something about who we are.” 

In 2017 Seiwert’s first full-evening work, “Wandering,” set to Schubert’s Winterreise, was commissioned by the Joyce Theater in New York. The NEA and Kennedy Center have also supported Seiwert’s works. A former Artist in Residence at ODC Theater, she has also served on the Artist Faculty for Jacob’s Pillow’s Contemporary Ballet program. Her creations are in the repertory of Smuin, ODC/Dance, Ballet Austin, BalletX, Opera Parallèle, AXIS Dance, Oakland Ballet, and others. She is honored to be rejoining the artistic team of Smuin Ballet.

Michael Smuin

Michael Smuin

Choreographer, The Eternal Idol

“In 1994, Michael Smuin set out to “infuse ballet with the rhythm, speed, and syncopation of American popular culture.”

In 1994, Michael Smuin set out to “infuse ballet with the rhythm, speed, and syncopation of American popular culture,” and Smuin Contemporary Ballet (née Smuin Ballets/SF, or more recently, Smuin Ballet) was born. Michael Smuin’s vision lives on following his sudden passing in 2007, and the Company continues to push the boundaries of contemporary ballet within a distinctly modern style, combining classical ballet training, technique, and artistry with uncommon physicality and expression.

Company Founder Michael Smuin was born on October 13, 1938, in Missoula, Montana. Smuin studied tap dancing as a child and became instantly enamoured with ballet when his mother took him to see the Ballet Russe on tour at the University of Montana. At the age of 15, Smuin moved to Salt Lake City to study dance on scholarship at the University of Utah. A few years later, San Francisco Ballet director Lew Christensen recruited Smuin for San Francisco Ballet, where he danced for six years. Smuin took a leave of absence from the company in 1962 to relocate to New York, where he performed in Bob Fosse’s Little Me on Broadway. During this time, Smuin created a nightclub act with his then-wife and fellow dancer Paula Tracy. Their “well-disguised ballet,” as Smuin would call it, toured widely and was billed alongside such entertainers as Louis Armstrong, Peggy Lee, and Frank Sinatra. The act later appeared on television on The Ed Sullivan Show, The Hollywood Palace, and Bell Telephone Hour, among others. Smuin joined American Ballet Theatre in 1965, where he choreographed Pulcinella Variations, The Catherine Wheel, Eternal Idol and several other pieces for the company before returning to San Francisco in 1973. During his years in New York he also worked with Leonard Bernstein, choreographing Candide.

Smuin spent 12 years as a choreographer and co-director of San Francisco Ballet, a period that coincided with his direction of Sophisticated Ladies on Broadway. Smuin served as Artistic Director of San Francisco Ballet until 1985, and was instrumental in raising the company’s profile in the international arts community. His ventures included serving as co-chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts dance panel (1979-1981), staging a performance at the White House, and presenting his Romeo and Juliet and his Emmy Award-winning feature A Song for Dead Warriors for PBS’s Dance in America program. In 1988, Smuin received both a Tony and a Drama Desk Award for his choreography for Anything Goes.

Outside of ballet and Broadway, Smuin choreographed several Francis Ford Coppola films, some of which include Rumble Fish, The Cotton Club and Bram Stoker’s Dracula. His choreography can also be seen in such films as A Walk in the Clouds, The Joy Luck Club, The Fantastiks, and Star Wars: Episode VI – Return of the Jedi (Special Edition).

Michael Smuin’s ballets are currently in the repertories of major dance companies around the country. Since founding Smuin Contemporary American Ballet in 1994, he created 40 new works for his company alone. His creations range from classical, as seen in his acclaimed September 11th tribute, Stabat Mater (2002), and Carmina Burana (1997), to the innovative Bluegrass/Slyde with its revolving-pole set, to one-act story ballets like Pinocchio (1999) and  Zorro (2003). Many of Smuin’s ballet’s boast a touch of Broadway flair, such as the wildly popular Dancin’ With Gershwin (2001) and Fly Me to the Moon (2004).

Smuin passed away suddenly on April 23, 2007, surrounded by his dancers while teaching company class. His vision, style, and energy remain with the Company to this day.

Rex Wheeler

Rex Wheeler

Choreographer, Sinfonietta

Originally from London, Rex Wheeler is a multi-faceted drag performer, actor, producer and choreographer. Having trained in the UK at the Royal Ballet School and Elmhurst, Rex danced with the Slovak National Ballet, Sacramento Ballet and Smuin Contemporary Ballet before becoming a working choreographer here in the US. Rex simultaneously embarked on a career in drag, creating his alter-ego Lady Camden and became the runner up of Season 14 of RuPaul’s Drag Race. He has since performed all over the world, starring in solo shows, performing in world tours, producing music as well as continuing to choreograph and produce shows here in San Francisco. Rex recently starred in a new documentary, “Lady Like,” directed by Luke Willis which has been featured in many film festivals around the world, and continues to perform, choreograph, and produce performances and events throughout the year as both Rex and Lady Camden.

Photo by Maximillian Tortoriello